1. ratak-monodosico:

Beverage logic

    ratak-monodosico:

    Beverage logic

  2. newyorker:


MINNEAPOLIS (The Borowitz Report)—Historians studying archival photographs from four decades ago have come to the conclusion that the U.S. must have believed in science at some point.

Continue reading: http://nyr.kr/1kLL9l1

    newyorker:

    MINNEAPOLIS (The Borowitz Report)—Historians studying archival photographs from four decades ago have come to the conclusion that the U.S. must have believed in science at some point.

    Continue reading: http://nyr.kr/1kLL9l1

  3. bookpatrol:

Smart cars…
The world is a book by KatWrdPhoto on Flickr.

    bookpatrol:

    Smart cars…

    The world is a book by KatWrdPhoto on Flickr.

  4. preved-medved-pls:

stephank:

If someone ever asks you what Tumblr is, just show them this picture.

In a nutshell

    preved-medved-pls:

    stephank:

    If someone ever asks you what Tumblr is, just show them this picture.

    In a nutshell

  5. How DARPA's Brain Chip Could Restore Lost Memories →

  6. photojojo:

    Brian Nice is a world-renowned fashion photographer who suffered a traumatic brain injury in 2009, which left his vision erratic at best.

    Using a plastic Holga camera to depict how he sees the world, Brian set out on a cross-country photography trip last September and has been blogging the entire way.

    Recovering From a Traumatic Brain Injury Through Photography

    via The New York Times

  7. ultrafacts:

    For more posts like this, CLICK HERE to follow Ultrafacts

  8. 8 July 2014

    32 notes

    Reblogged from
    stoweboyd

    The future has already been a disappointment.

    — 

    Paul Starr, The Second Machine Age, Reviewed 

    Starr juxtaposes techno optimism and pessimism, spiraling about the core question: why doesn’t rapid innovation in technology and science lead to a/ higher productivity and b/ better economic outcomes for all?

    Brynjolfsson and McAfee, the authors of The Second Machine Age, blame the former on organizational inertia, and the fact that value may not be falling, even when prices are (think about the music industry). Basically, they say our economics hasn’t caught up with the foundational changes in our economy.

    Robert Gordon is a Northwestern economist who has long contended that technology’s benefits are largely overstated. His work suggests that growth might be less than 1% in the decades to come because of various ‘headwinds’ — like demographic change, declining educational quality, inequality, and economic adjustment (think music business).

    Starr summarizes Gordon’s position on b/:

    Unless we change our policies in such areas as education, health care, and taxation, the bottom 99 percent will not see much improvement in living standards. For the great majority of Americans, the problem is that productivity growth, whatever its real level, is not translating into higher incomes. The gains from growth are going to the top—and on this point Brynjolfsson and McAfee have no disagreement with Gordon.

    Starr wants to end on a hopeful note, so he suggests that ‘we will find a way forward only when we can put growth and equality back together’.

    But that is more of dream than a roadmap. Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty First Century suggests that we might be moving into an era — the postnormal — when income inequality and the oligarchic conservation of wealth will become the new steady state. And technological innovation may be an engine for that, rather than a force for equality and a better future for all.

    (via stoweboyd)

  9. The Guggenheim wins at social media. →

    cavetocanvas:

    If you’re like me and follow a bunch of museums on places like Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, etc, you might have noticed more than a few posting about Marc Chagall’s birthday, where the museum/institution in question highlighted one of his works in their collection and wished him a happy birthday….

  10. What "open learning" looks like when it's for kids who need it most →

    mostlysignssomeportents:

    image

    We’ve heard a lot of talk these days about open educational resources and online courses and how these platforms can make high-quality learning available for all. The code.org campaign has been touting the potential of online courses to teach kids how to code. Khan Academy has been the…

  11. Tell the king; the fair wrought house has fallen
    No shelter has Apollo, nor sacred laurel leaves
    The fountains are now silent; the voice is stilled.
    It is finished.

    — The final recorded words of the last Oracle of Delphi, 395 AD. (via elucipher)

    (Source: arkadelphia)

  12. scienceyoucanlove:

Reaching a kilometre into the sky, China’s new environmentally friendly skyscrapers will feature pollution-absorbing coatings, vertical gardens, insect hotels, wind turbines and solar cells. They’ll clean the surrounding water and provide sustainable power to neighbouring buildings.Read more: bit.ly/1ogTMHX
source 

    scienceyoucanlove:

    Reaching a kilometre into the sky, China’s new environmentally friendly skyscrapers will feature pollution-absorbing coatings, vertical gardens, insect hotels, wind turbines and solar cells. They’ll clean the surrounding water and provide sustainable power to neighbouring buildings.

    Read more: bit.ly/1ogTMHX

    source 

  13. erikkwakkel:

    Smart page with string

    These pages from a late-16th-century scientific manuscript share a most unusual feature: they contain a string that runs through a pierced hole. Dozens of them are found in this book. The pages contain diagrams that accompany astronomical tracts. They show such things as the working of the astrolabe (Pic 1), the position of the stars (Pic 4), and the movement of the sun (Pic 6). The book was written and copied by the cartographer Jean du Temps of Blois (born 1555), about whom little appears to be known. The book contains a number of volvelles or wheel charts: revolving disks that the reader would turn to execute calculations. The strings seen in these images are another example of the “hands-on” kind of reading the book facilitates. Pulling the string tight and moving it from left to right, or all the way around, would connect different bits of data, like a modern computer: the string drew a temporary line between two or more values, highlighting their relationship. The tiny addition made the physical page as smart as its contents.

    Pics: London, British Library, Harley MS 3263: more on this book here; and full digital reproduction here.

  14. cross-connect:

    Porcelain Figures series by photographer Martin Klimas

    From a height of three meters, porcelain figurines are dropped on the ground, and the sound they make when they hit trips the shutter release. The result: razor-sharp images of disturbing beauty—temporary sculptures made visible to the human eye by high-speed photography technology. The porcelain statuette bursting into pieces isn’t what really captures the attention; the fascination lies in the genesis of a dynamic figure that replaces the static pose. In contrast to the inertness of the intact kitsch figurines Klimas started out with, the photographs of their destruction possess a powerfully narrative character.” (text from martin-klimas.de)

    Pictures from Juxtapoz Magazine

    Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki

  15. Ten Things We Can Learn From The Elderly... →

    joannechocolat:

    How often are elderly people dismissed by the young for being slow or out-of-touch? And yet, in more enlightened times, they were respected and revered. Following yesterday’s post about children, here are ten things we can all learn from the older generations…

    1. Acceptance. The more a person…