1. artemisdreaming:

Blind Harper in Tomb of Nakht

From wiki:  During the Middle Kingdom (c. 2040–1640 BCE) blind harpists are depicted on tomb walls. The ancient Egyptians were not exclusively interested in the causes and cures for blindness but also the social care of the individual.”  Wiki source: The history of special education”, Margret A. Winzer”, p. 463, Gallaudet University Press, 1993, ISBN 1-56368-018-1
… The Ancient Egyptians were the first civilisation to display an interest in the causes and cures for disabilities and during some periods blind people are recorded as representing a substantial portion of the poets and musicians in society.  Wiki source:  ”Everybody belongs”, Arthur H. Shapiro, p. 152, Routledge, 2000, ISBN 0-8153-3960-7

    artemisdreaming:

    Blind Harper in Tomb of Nakht

    From wiki:  During the Middle Kingdom (c. 2040–1640 BCE) blind harpists are depicted on tomb walls. The ancient Egyptians were not exclusively interested in the causes and cures for blindness but also the social care of the individual.”  Wiki source: The history of special education”, Margret A. Winzer”, p. 463, Gallaudet University Press, 1993, ISBN 1-56368-018-1

    … The Ancient Egyptians were the first civilisation to display an interest in the causes and cures for disabilities and during some periods blind people are recorded as representing a substantial portion of the poets and musicians in society.  Wiki source:  ”Everybody belongs”, Arthur H. Shapiro, p. 152, Routledge, 2000, ISBN 0-8153-3960-7

  2. mapsontheweb:

Most popular baby boy names in England
Data source: Office for National Statistics

    mapsontheweb:

    Most popular baby boy names in England

    Data source: Office for National Statistics

  3. artemisdreaming:

artemisdreaming:

1854 Woodcut Ancient Egyptian Remeses Harp Musician

Lay of the Harper
'Tis well with this good prince; his day is done, His happy fate fulfilled… . So one goes forth While others, as in days of old, remain. The old kings slumber in their pyramids, Likewise the noble and the learned, but some Who builded tombs have now no place of rest, Although their deeds were great… . Lo! I have heard The words Imhotep and Hordadaf spake— Their maxims men repeat… . Where are their tombs?— Long fallen … e’en their places are unknown, And they are now as though they ne’er had been.
No soul comes back to tell us how he fares— To soothe and comfort us ere we depart Whither he went betimes… . But let our minds Forget of this and dwell on better things… . Revel in pleasure while your life endures And deck your head with myrrh. Be richly clad In white and perfumed linen; like the gods Anointed be; and never weary grow In eager quest of what your heart desires— Do as it prompts you … until that sad day
Of lamentation comes, when hearts at rest Hear not the cry of mourners at the tomb, Which have no meaning to the silent dead. Then celebrate this festal time, nor pause— For no man takes his riches to the grave; Yea, none returns again when he goes hence.

From Egyptian Myth and Legend by Donald Mackenzie, 1907: “One of the most popular Egyptian poems is called “The Lay of the Harper”. It was chanted at the banquets given by wealthy men. “Ere the company rises,” wrote Herodotus, “a small coffin which contains a perfect model of the human body is carried round, and is shown to each guest in rotation. He who bears it exclaims: ‘Look at this figure… . After death you will be like it. Drink, therefore, and be merry.’” The “lay” in its earliest form was of great antiquity. Probably a real mummy was originally hauled through the banquet hall.” via: Sacred Texts

    artemisdreaming:

    artemisdreaming:

    1854 Woodcut Ancient Egyptian Remeses Harp Musician

    Lay of the Harper

    'Tis well with this good prince; his day is done,
     His happy fate fulfilled… . So one goes forth
     While others, as in days of old, remain.
     The old kings slumber in their pyramids,
     Likewise the noble and the learned, but some
     Who builded tombs have now no place of rest,
     Although their deeds were great… .
     Lo! I have heard The words Imhotep and Hordadaf spake—
     Their maxims men repeat… . Where are their tombs?—
     Long fallen … e’en their places are unknown,
     And they are now as though they ne’er had been.

    No soul comes back to tell us how he fares—
     To soothe and comfort us ere we depart
     Whither he went betimes… . But let our minds
     Forget of this and dwell on better things… .
     Revel in pleasure while your life endures
     And deck your head with myrrh. Be richly clad
     In white and perfumed linen; like the gods
     Anointed be; and never weary grow
     In eager quest of what your heart desires—
     Do as it prompts you … until that sad day

    Of lamentation comes, when hearts at rest
     Hear not the cry of mourners at the tomb,
     Which have no meaning to the silent dead.
     Then celebrate this festal time, nor pause—
     For no man takes his riches to the grave;
     Yea, none returns again when he goes hence.

    From Egyptian Myth and Legend by Donald Mackenzie, 1907: “One of the most popular Egyptian poems is called “The Lay of the Harper”. It was chanted at the banquets given by wealthy men. “Ere the company rises,” wrote Herodotus, “a small coffin which contains a perfect model of the human body is carried round, and is shown to each guest in rotation. He who bears it exclaims: ‘Look at this figure… . After death you will be like it. Drink, therefore, and be merry.’” The “lay” in its earliest form was of great antiquity. Probably a real mummy was originally hauled through the banquet hall.” via: Sacred Texts

  4. 4gifs:

Parrot makes it rain. [video]

    4gifs:

    Parrot makes it rain. [video]

    (Source: ForGIFs.com)

  5. brucesterling:


*You should buy this book so that more universities will come up with weird cool projects like this.
http://www.harpercollins.com/9780062204691/hieroglyph
About the Book

Inspired by New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson, an anthology of stories, set in the near future, from some of today’s leading writers, thinkers, and visionaries that reignites the iconic and optimistic visions of the golden age of science fiction.
In his 2011 article “Innovation Starvation,” Neal Stephenson argued that we—the society whose earlier scientists and engineers witnessed the airplane, the automobile, nuclear energy, the computer, and space exploration—must reignite our ambitions to think boldly and do Big Stuff. He also advanced the Hieroglyph Theory which illuminates the power of science fiction to inspire the inventive imagination: “Good SF supplies a plausible, fully thought-out picture of an alternate reality in which some sort of compelling innovation has taken place.”
In 2012, Arizona State University established the Center for Science and the Imagination to bring together writers, artists, and creative thinkers with scientists, engineers, and technologists to cultivate and expand on “moon shot ideas” that inspire the imagination and catalyze real-world innovations.
Now comes this remarkable anthology uniting twenty of today’s leading thinkers, writers, and visionaries—among them Cory Doctorow, Gregory Benford, Elizabeth Bear, Bruce Sterling, and Neal Stephenson—to contribute works of “techno-optimism” that challenge us to dream and do Big Stuff. Engaging, mind-bending, provocative, and imaginative, Hieroglyph offers a forward-thinking approach to the intersection of art and technology that has the power to change our world. 

    brucesterling:

    *You should buy this book so that more universities will come up with weird cool projects like this.

    http://www.harpercollins.com/9780062204691/hieroglyph

    About the Book

    Inspired by New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson, an anthology of stories, set in the near future, from some of today’s leading writers, thinkers, and visionaries that reignites the iconic and optimistic visions of the golden age of science fiction.

    In his 2011 article “Innovation Starvation,” Neal Stephenson argued that we—the society whose earlier scientists and engineers witnessed the airplane, the automobile, nuclear energy, the computer, and space exploration—must reignite our ambitions to think boldly and do Big Stuff. He also advanced the Hieroglyph Theory which illuminates the power of science fiction to inspire the inventive imagination: “Good SF supplies a plausible, fully thought-out picture of an alternate reality in which some sort of compelling innovation has taken place.”

    In 2012, Arizona State University established the Center for Science and the Imagination to bring together writers, artists, and creative thinkers with scientists, engineers, and technologists to cultivate and expand on “moon shot ideas” that inspire the imagination and catalyze real-world innovations.

    Now comes this remarkable anthology uniting twenty of today’s leading thinkers, writers, and visionaries—among them Cory Doctorow, Gregory Benford, Elizabeth Bear, Bruce Sterling, and Neal Stephenson—to contribute works of “techno-optimism” that challenge us to dream and do Big Stuff. Engaging, mind-bending, provocative, and imaginative, Hieroglyph offers a forward-thinking approach to the intersection of art and technology that has the power to change our world. 

  6. mapsontheweb:

Live Map of the War in Ukraine

    mapsontheweb:

    Live Map of the War in Ukraine

  7. The world you take for granted everyday is being aggressively designed for you by people who don’t know you.

    The potential of design in supporting social and personal action resides in the democratic nature of its process. Design is good for defining a vision and then crafting a plan or roadmap to guide the realization of this vision. Visions with clear paths of implementation provide a beacon for us to collaborate efficiently and optimistically on large projects.

    — 

    Jason Severs, via

    (via stoweboyd)

  8. skunkbear:

    So photographer David Slater wants Wikipedia to remove a monkey selfie that was taken with his camera. As you can see from this screen shot, Wikipedia says no: the monkey pressed the shutter so it owns the copyright.

    We got NPR’s in-house legal counsel, Ashley Messenger, to weigh in. She said:

    Traditional interpretation of copyright law is that the person who captured the image owns the copyright. That would be the monkey. The photographer’s best argument is that the monkey took the photo at his direction and therefore it’s work for hire. But that’s not a great argument because it’s not clear the monkey had the intent to work at the direction of the photographer nor is it clear there was “consideration” (value) exchanged for the work. So… It’s definitely an interesting question! Or the photographer could argue that leaving the camera to see what would happen is his work an therefore the monkey’s capture of the image was really the photographer’s art, but that would be a novel approach, to my knowledge.

  9. micdotcom:

    NASA is turning to the public to help analyze 1.8M photos from space

    For the first time ever, NASA is making tons of images, from the first American missions to space to shots from the International Space Station, available to everyone via a massive database called the Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

    The photographs are the most detailed shots ever taken of our planet, and, when examined together, can help scientists get a better sense of Earth’s overall health. While night photographs highlight our most-developed cities, daytime shots show patterns of air pollution and underwater blooms of algae. By studying patterns of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the levels of light pollution emitted from densely-packed cities, scientists can use these images to monitor global energy use, spot harmful soil erosion and water depletion and locate wildlife in danger of habitat destruction.

    3 categories they’re looking to identify | Follow micdotcom 

  10. tacanderson:

Majority of Americans download zero smartphone apps every month
The case is made in the article that most of a users app downloads probably come in the first few months. This will start pushing large companies to pay to get their apps preinstalled on phones. This will lead to the same problem  for Android phones as PCs have with all of the crapwear.
From what I’ve seen already carriers and manufacturers are already perpetuating this. From all the phones I’ve had, my Google Play store has over 20 apps in it from device manufactures and carriers, many of which are duplicative to apps that come from Google. The iPhone, like their Mac counter parts, don’t have this problem, but does have their own useless apps you can’t remove.
This will be a big problem for Android phones. 

    tacanderson:

    Majority of Americans download zero smartphone apps every month

    The case is made in the article that most of a users app downloads probably come in the first few months. This will start pushing large companies to pay to get their apps preinstalled on phones. This will lead to the same problem  for Android phones as PCs have with all of the crapwear.

    From what I’ve seen already carriers and manufacturers are already perpetuating this. From all the phones I’ve had, my Google Play store has over 20 apps in it from device manufactures and carriers, many of which are duplicative to apps that come from Google. The iPhone, like their Mac counter parts, don’t have this problem, but does have their own useless apps you can’t remove.

    This will be a big problem for Android phones. 

  11. 22 August 2014

    1 note

    Reblogged from
    steph

    I called out to some as they left, ‘Can’t you even listen to ideas you disagree with? In Oxford, of all places, you should be open-minded enough to hear alternative views’. But no. They said I needed an open mind. This really got to me, raising painful memories of my early research on psychics and clairvoyants who said, ‘You just don’t have an open mind,’ when my careful experiments showed no psychic powers. By the time I moved on to showing Internet memes and viral videos more than half the audience was gone.

    — A hundred walked out of my lecture | Richard Dawkins Foundation (via steph)

  12. http://indigenousdialogues.tumblr.com/post/95454511314/for-loren-eiseley-big-bang-breaches-the →

    indigenousdialogues:

    (for Loren Eiseley)

    Big Bang breaches the
    membrane,
    rushes into the vacuum.

    Barred owl’s incantation
    bruises dew gathering on grass.
    The Pleiades come into focus
    when looked at askance.

    Words: elemental, essential,
    nothing about things,
    their own Milky Way.

    When language falls away,…

  13. post-mitotic:

microscopic bone marrow transplant — hematopoietic stem cells (the immortal source of both red and white blood cells) poised in a syringe for transplant
colored SEM composite image
credit: Steve Gschmeissner

    post-mitotic:

    microscopic bone marrow transplant — hematopoietic stem cells (the immortal source of both red and white blood cells) poised in a syringe for transplant

    colored SEM composite image

    credit: Steve Gschmeissner

  14. currentsinbiology:

Children with autism have extra synapses in brain: May be possible to prune synapses with drug after diagnosis
Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain “pruning” process during development, according to a study by neuroscientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). Because synapses are the points where neurons connect and communicate with each other, the excessive synapses may have profound effects on how the brain functions. The study was published in the August 21 online issue of the journal Neuron.
Guomei Tang, Kathryn Gudsnuk, Sheng-Han Kuo, Marisa L. Cotrina, Gorazd Rosoklija, Alexander Sosunov, Mark S. Sonders, Ellen Kanter, Candace Castagna, Ai Yamamoto, Zhenyu Yue, Ottavio Arancio, Bradley S. Peterson, Frances Champagne, Andrew J. Dwork, James Goldman, David Sulzer. Loss of mTOR-Dependent Macroautophagy Causes Autistic-like Synaptic Pruning Deficits. Neuron, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.07.040
In a study of brains from children with autism, researchers found that autistic brains did not undergo normal pruning during childhood and adolescence. The images show representative neurons from autistic (left) and control (right) brains; the spines on the neurons indicate the location of synapses.  Credit: Guomei Tang, PhD and Mark S. Sonders, PhD/Columbia University Medical Center

    currentsinbiology:

    Children with autism have extra synapses in brain: May be possible to prune synapses with drug after diagnosis

    Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain “pruning” process during development, according to a study by neuroscientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). Because synapses are the points where neurons connect and communicate with each other, the excessive synapses may have profound effects on how the brain functions. The study was published in the August 21 online issue of the journal Neuron.

    Guomei Tang, Kathryn Gudsnuk, Sheng-Han Kuo, Marisa L. Cotrina, Gorazd Rosoklija, Alexander Sosunov, Mark S. Sonders, Ellen Kanter, Candace Castagna, Ai Yamamoto, Zhenyu Yue, Ottavio Arancio, Bradley S. Peterson, Frances Champagne, Andrew J. Dwork, James Goldman, David Sulzer. Loss of mTOR-Dependent Macroautophagy Causes Autistic-like Synaptic Pruning Deficits. Neuron, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.07.040

    In a study of brains from children with autism, researchers found that autistic brains did not undergo normal pruning during childhood and adolescence. The images show representative neurons from autistic (left) and control (right) brains; the spines on the neurons indicate the location of synapses.  Credit: Guomei Tang, PhD and Mark S. Sonders, PhD/Columbia University Medical Center

  15. mapsontheweb:

Most recurrent words on Wikipedia, excluding : “Country”, linking words, demonyms and “government”.

    mapsontheweb:

    Most recurrent words on Wikipedia, excluding : “Country”, linking words, demonyms and “government”.